Bizarre Conservative MP Paul Calandra’s Wikipedia Page Vandalized

Someone really pissed off has edited Paul Calandra’s Wikipedia entry to reflect the Conservative MP’s bizarre obsession with Israel

by: Obert Madondo  | Published Tuesday, Sept 30, 2014

A screenshot of Conservative MP Paul Calandra's Wikipedia page, taken on Monday, September 29, shows that it was edited to reflect his bizarre obsession with Israel.

A screenshot of Conservative MP Paul Calandra’s Wikipedia page, taken on Monday, September 29, shows that it was edited to reflect his bizarre obsession with Israel.

During Question Period on Tuesday last week, NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair got a bizarre response after he asked the government to confirm that the 30-day Canadian military commitment in Iraq to fight the Islamic State would indeed end on October 4, 2014. Paul Calandra, Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s Parliamentary Secretary, responded by questioning the New Democrats’ loyalty to Israel.

The NDP leader asked two more questions relating to Canada’s military involvement in Iraq. Calandra responded by reiterating the Conservatives’ unwavering support of Israel.

Appearing on CBC News a day later, Calandra vigorously defended his shameful response, prompting fellow panelist and NDP MP Paul Dewar to make the now-famous facepalm that captured the nation’s frustration with the Conservatives.

Calandra’s responses solicited universal ridicule and condemnation by Canadians and the media. Global News called the exchange between Mulcair, the Speaker and Calandra “unreal.” Postmedia declared that Calandra’s response is exactly “why Canadians hate Question Period.” Macleans accused Calandra of demonstrating “contempt for Parliament.”

Calandra tearfully apologized in Parliament last Friday. That hasn’t pacified the person who defaced his Wikipedia page. The edit seems to highlight Calandra’s obsession with Israel, even labeling him a “member of the Israel Parliament” and “parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Obfuscation.

Intro – Original
Paul Calandra (born May 13, 1970) is a Canadian politician. He was elected to represent the electoral district of Oak Ridges—Markham in the 2008 Canadian federal election. He is a member of the Conservative Party of Canada and in the past has been involved in the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario and the Canadian Alliance.

Edit

Paul Calandra (born May 13, 1970) is a Canadian clapping seal. He was elected to act like a petulant teenager on behalf of the electoral district of Oak Ridges—Markham in the 2008 Canadian federal election. He is a member of the Conservative Party of Canada and in the past has been involved in the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario and the Canadian Alliance.

Background – Original
Prior to entering politics, Calandra was an insurance broker, from 1995 to 2003. He then served as chief of staff to Steve Gilchrist, who served as the Ontario Progressive Conservative MPP for Scarborough East in the government of Mike Harris.

He ran as the federal Canadian Alliance candidate in the Scarborough East riding in the 2000 election, but lost to Liberal Party of Canada candidate John McKay.

Edit

Prior to entering politics, Israel.

He ran as the federal Israel.

Paul Calandra Wikipedia page edit

Paul Calandra Wikipedia page edit

Politics – Original

Following his election in 2008, in Calandra’s first term he sat on the Access to Information, Privacy, and Ethics Committee, Citizenship and Immigration Committee, and the Government Operations and Estimates Committee.

During this term he also introduced two private member’s bills. On June 19, 2009 he introduced ‘An Act to Change the Name of the Electoral District of Oak Ridges—Markham’, [2] and on March 11, 2011 he introduced ‘An Act Respecting the Establishment of a National Strategy for the Purchase and Sale of Second-Hand Precious Metal Articles.

He was re-elected in the 2011 election. In the 41st Parliament he was appointed parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages where he sat on the Standing Committee for Canadian Heritage and formerly the Standing Committee on Bill C-11. His current position, as of September 2013 Paul Calandra was appointed parliamentary secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs.

As the Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister, Calandra was often called on to rise in the House of Commons during Question Period to field questions on behalf of the Prime Minister during the Senate Scandal (2013). This brought Calandra under a great deal of scrutiny for his perceived non-answers, deflections, and attacks, and prompted widespread backlash in the form of media articles, social media postings and even an automated humour website that allowed Canadians to ask questions and receive answers.[3] On 23 September 2014, Calandra’s repeated refusal to acknowledge questions about Canada’s involvement in Iraq led Thomas Mulcair to question the integrity of the Speaker of the House, who did not intervene. Calandra instead insisted on reiterating Canada’s commitment to Israel, prompting Global News to describe the exchange as “unreal”. [4]

Edit

Following his election in 2008, Israel.

During this term he also introduced two Israels.

He was re-elected in the 2011 election. In the 41st Parliament he was appointed parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Obfuscation where he recited his favourite recipes in answer to questions like, “may I see your ID badge, sir?”. As of September 2013 Paul Calandra was appointed parliamentary class clown to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs.

As the Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister, Calandra was often called on to rise in the House of Commons during Question Period to field questions on behalf of the Prime Minister during the Senate Scandal. This brought Calandra under a great deal of scrutiny for his perceived non-answers, deflections, and attacks, and prompted widespread backlash in the form of media articles, social media postings and even an automated humour website that allowed Canadians to ask questions and receive answers.[1] On 23 September 2014, Calandra’s repeated refusal to acknowledge questions about Canada’s involvement in Iraq led Thomas Mulcair to question the integrity of the Speaker of the House, who did not intervene. Calandra instead insisted on reiterating Canada’s commitment to Israel, prompting Global News to describe the exchange as “unreal”.[2]

The NDP has introduced a motion that seeks “enhance the daily Question Period, make Parliament more democratic and ensure that future governments will not be able to use tricks to evade giving Canadians answers.”

Obert Madondo is an Ottawa-based progressive blogger, and the founder and editor of The Canadian Progressive. Follow him on Twitter.com/Obiemad

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Obert Madondo

Publisher and editor
Obert Madondo is an Ottawa-based blogger, activist, photographer, digital rights enthusiast, former political aide, and former international development administrator. He's the founder and editor of these independent publications: The Canadian Progressive, a political blog dedicated to progressive Canadian journalism; The Zimbabwean Progressive, a political blog dedicated to producing fearless, progressive, adversarial, unapologetic, and activism-oriented Zimbabwean journalism; and Charity Files, a publication dedicated to journalism in the charitable public's interest. Follow Obert on Twitter: @Obiemad
  • Tom

    Is he the most hated MP in Parliament?

  • When questions are asked they should be answered honestly the Conservatives have been doing this for a long time… they should be more accountable for their Actions after all the Canadians want to know what their doing since they were elected to run the country.

    • Let’s see how they’ll vote on the NDP’s motion which seeks to ensure more accountability by the government of the day – by cracking down on nonsensical answers during Question Period, and giving the Speaker the teeth to keep debates on track. The House votes on the motion today.